DEVELOPMENT OF LIGHTWEIGHT CONCRETE FROM EXPANDED CLAY MODIFIED WITH TIRE RUBBER WASTE

Fernanda M. Cavalcante de Melo, José Nilton Soares Santos, Herbet Alves Oliveira, Cochiran Pereira dos Santos, Zélia Soares Macedo, Vanessa Gentil de Oliveira Almeida

Abstract


Lightweight concrete has as main characteristic its low density due to the incorporation of light materials such as expanded clay, or even the incorporation of air whose function is to reduce the density, characteristic of cellular concrete. In Aracaju city, there are companies that promote tire reconditioning, generating large amounts of waste dust. The aim of this work is to study the reuse of tire rubber waste in light concrete from expanded clay. An experimental program was developed for the analysis of these concretes, varying the percentage of 1%, 2.5% and 5% of the tire rubber waste to replace the natural fine aggregate and 100% replacing the natural coarse aggregate by expanded clay (50% of expanded clay C1506 and 50% of C2215). The materials (cement, sand, expanded clays and tire rubber waste) were characterized through tests of particle size analysis and unit mass. The hardened concrete was evaluated through mechanical tests of axial compression strength, modulus of elasticity and tensile strength by diametrical compression, physical tests of water absorption and specific mass, in addition to image analysis by scanning electron microscopy. The use of expanded clay with incorporation of 1% of tire rubber waste guaranteed better results in mechanical resistance, lower water absorption and greater specific mass than the mixtures with 2.5 and 5%, reaching values close to the reference concrete. Thus, the residue can be an alternative for reuse, avoiding disposal.

Keywords


lightweight concrete, expanded clay, tire rubber waste.

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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7764/RIC.00008.21

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